pyrrhiccomedy:

moniquill:

accioharo:

blackandyellowdoodles:

justacynicalirishman:

babyshibe:

doctorgaylove:

thecoppercow:

That Mysterious “S” Thing We Used to Draw (by the1janitor)

We used to draw this as kids and it’s always confused me. It still really bothers me tbh.

This is really creepy tbh.

yeah we used to draw these! around 2002. at the time i was told it was like the slipknot logo but now i know it’s totally not. but we did used to get in trouble for drawing them.

we never got in trouble with them. I had them all over my school planner lol. 

(We did call them ‘super S’) 

There’s this awesome book I read called ‘The People in the Playground’ which concerns the observations of an anthropologist on children’s folklore: the stuff that kids independently teach one another in school yards and playgrounds that has no real connection to adult lore and media. This is a great example of it, as are hand clapping and jump rope verses.


If you can finish the lines “Miss Mary Mack Mack Mack all dressed in black black black…” or ‘Hinky Pinky Ponky, Daddy had a donkey…”or “Miss Suzy had a steamboat…” or “Engine Engine number nine…”

stop and think about where you learned them.


It probably wasn’t from an adult or out of a book or in any formal way. It was from another kid; someone a grade ahead of you or someone’s older sibling or something. Who learned it the same way.

This is CHILD lore. Sometimes a fad will come and go in a single age cohort, sometimes it’ll last for generations. It’s kind of awesome.

The idea of child lore and a distinct child culture is really interesting, especially when you consider that children have a few traditions that go back hundreds of years.

For example: did you ever play “Quaker’s meeting?” Quaker’s meeting has begun, no more laughter, no more fun…that dates back two centuries

And of course there’s “Ring around the rosie,” which goes all the way back to the time of the black plague.

Children pass these things down among themselves as part of a legacy they lack the context to fully understand; but you could say the same thing about most adult traditions. That unbroken chain of shared knowledge connects their play to the play of children from hundreds of years ago, without any adult input or encouragement.

That’s cool.

thinksquad:

If you take to Twitter to express your views on a hot-button issue, does the government have an interest in deciding whether you are spreading “misinformation’’? If you tweet your support for a candidate in the November elections, should taxpayer money be used to monitor your speech and evaluate your “partisanship’’?

My guess is that most Americans would answer those questions with a resounding no. But the federal government seems to disagree. The National Science Foundation , a federal agency whose mission is to “promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity and welfare; and to secure the national defense,” is funding a project to collect and analyze your Twitter data.

The project is being developed by researchers at Indiana University, and its purported aim is to detect what they deem “social pollution” and to study what they call “social epidemics,” including how memes — ideas that spread throughout pop culture — propagate. What types of social pollution are they targeting? “Political smears,” so-called “astroturfing” and other forms of “misinformation.”

Named “Truthy,” after a term coined by TV host Stephen Colbert, the project claims to use a “sophisticated combination of text and data mining, social network analysis, and complex network models” to distinguish between memes that arise in an “organic manner” and those that are manipulated into being.

But there’s much more to the story. Focusing in particular on political speech, Truthy keeps track of which Twitter accounts are using hashtags such as #teaparty and #dems. It estimates users’ “partisanship.” It invites feedback on whether specific Twitter users, such as the Drudge Report, are “truthy” or “spamming.” And it evaluates whether accounts are expressing “positive” or “negative” sentiments toward other users or memes.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/truthy-project-is-unworthy-of-tax-dollars/2014/10/17/a3274faa-531b-11e4-809b-8cc0a295c773_story.html

China Hires As Many As 300,000 Internet Trolls To Make The Communist Party Look Good

fuckyeahmonsterenbies:

khaoskomix:

http://www.discordcomics.com/minoritymonsters/03-captain-sashay/

Captain Sashay doesn’t need your mer-binary.

Finally got another one of these out! Took a long while designing this character and making them consistent through all the panels.

Which monster should come next? 

http://vote.pollcode.com/71293375

Are you kidding me this is amazing

wolvensnothere:

Would be really nice to have access to the funds to have my own web host. Because I would like to have a place to post things where I wasn’t granting “a non-exclusive, worldwide, perpetual, irrevocable, royalty-free, sublicensable (through multiple tiers) right” to all my shit.

American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn't Exist | WIRED

abwatt:

Posted without comment, except to say that I’m trying to change this, one game design workshop and one teacher training at a time.

In geometry, wherever a proof of impossibility exists in classical logic a contradiction tolerant proof of existence must be considered. The set of Platonic solids is said to be finite because a proof of impossibility exists that shows if other Platonic solids existed then certain geometric assumptions would be contradicted.

It’s not like astronauts are braver than other people; we’re just meticulously prepared. We dissect what it is that’s going to scare us, and what it is that is a threat to us and then we practice over and over again so that the natural irrational fear is neutralized.

himikai:

ultrafacts:

Ultrafacts Source

My mom used to think I was crazy when I snatch the remote and turn it down from 26 to 25.


2 and 5 are real primes. They are two of the strangest primes as 2 is the only even real prime and the strangeness of 5 is hard to describe. However, both two and five are not complex primes. Each has factorizations in the Gaussian numbers. They are really irreducible, but you can imagine reductions of them. This would be relevant in the description and experience of sound as sound exhibits complex wave properties.

himikai:

ultrafacts:

Ultrafacts Source

My mom used to think I was crazy when I snatch the remote and turn it down from 26 to 25.

2 and 5 are real primes. They are two of the strangest primes as 2 is the only even real prime and the strangeness of 5 is hard to describe. However, both two and five are not complex primes. Each has factorizations in the Gaussian numbers. They are really irreducible, but you can imagine reductions of them. This would be relevant in the description and experience of sound as sound exhibits complex wave properties.

(Source: ultrafacts)

thinksquad:

It turns out Whisper — the social networking app that lets users post messages to the service anonymously — may have been tracking its users’ locations, sometimes even after the users opted out of the service’s geolocation features.

That information has occasionally been shared with the U.S. government, including agencies such as the Pentagon, using a lower legal standard than is commonly used by other tech companies, according to an in-depth report by The Guardian.

Reporters from The Guardian recently visited Whisper’s headquarters in Los Angeles. What they discovered over the course of three days showed that Whisper not only kept tabs on accounts it deemed interesting — “military personnel,” a “sex-obsessed lobbyist,” and political staffers, to name a few — but that it retained that information for far longer than its Web site suggested.

Whisper reportedly told The Guardian it “occasionally” uses user IP addresses but does not store usernames, phone numbers or personally identifiable information. Speaking to my colleague Tim Herrera, Whisper editor-in-chief Neetzan Zimmerman called the Guardian report a “pack of vicious lies.” In a statement, Whisper spokeswoman Tracy Akselrud said the company is not sharing “specific user data with any organization” but was working with the Defense Department on a study about post-traumatic stress disorder.

When a user opted out of the geolocation tracking feature, which allows users to see Whisper posts that are “nearby,” Whisper was still able to collect rough location data on a case-by-case basis from certain users’ phones, according to The Guardian. When Whisper found out that The Guardian was preparing its story for publication, the company reportedly rewrote its terms of service to allow the collection of general geolocation data even when users have turned off the feature.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2014/10/16/whisper-the-anonymous-messaging-app-that-reportedly-tracks-your-location-and-shares-data-with-the-pentagon/